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Ecovida Agroecology Network

The Ecovida Agroecology Network ("Rede" means network) emerged in southern Brazil to support agroecological farmers in that region. Led by farmers and non-governmental organizations, with participation from urban members, the network certifies its members’ products as Agroecological (which from the perspective of the State is the same designation as “organic,” although agroecological farmers often say that agroecology goes beyond organic). The main difference is that Rede Ecovida is participatory – this means that farmers themselves are also responsible for certifying each other's products. While there are many examples of participatory certification, Rede Ecovida was the first and remains one of the largest in the world.  Today the network has more than 4,500 agro-ecological families in four Brazilian states and maintains links with other similar national and international networks.  

Origins of the Ecovida Network
 

Why participate in agroecological networks?

Elaine and Sérgio own Sítio Florbela in Florianópolis (SC, Brazil). Farmers speak about their decision join the Ecovida Network of Agroecology.

How is the Ecovida Network organized?

Tânea is the coordinator of one of the groups in the Ecovida Network. She explains how the network is organized and how it operates. 

Support that the State does not give

Pepe dos Santos is a farmer who works in the communication of the Comuna Amarildo . He talks about the importance of organizations like Rede Ecovida which fill the gaps left by the State with respect to supporting agroecological farmers.

Network Food Sovereignty

Júlio Maestri is Coordinator of Urban Projects at CEPAGRO . He explains how Rede Ecovida and other spaces in the agroecology movement support food sovereignty – the right of producers and consumers to define their own food systems.   

Democratic Structure 

The Ecovida Network manages its activities in a decentralized manner. Producer families are organized into groups and farmers within groups support one another in their certification process. These groups are joined by associations or cooperatives and NGOs, such as CEPAGRO, along with groups of consumers, to form larger regional collectives called “Nucleos.” Greater Florianópolis farmers along with groups of consumers and CEPAGRO are organized in the Núcleo Litoral Catarinense. Regularly, farmers from other nucleos conduct site visits to verify that the farmers are following the required agroecological farming practices to maintain their certification label. 

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27 Regional Centers

The Ecovida network has 27 regional centers distributed throughout southern Brazil and part of the State of São Paulo.

Ecovida Agroecology Network

in numbers

4,500 families

Farm families who want to be part of the Ecovida Network undergo a technical visit to verify the possibility of agroecological transition.

352 Towns

The producers come from a range of municipalities across sothern Brazil.

340 Group of agroecological family farmers

The various groups of the Ecovida Network are organized into regional centers called Regional Nucleos

20 NGOs

Non-governmental organizations provide technical advice to farmers and help them organize groups and regional centers.

120 agroecological fairs

All the agroecological fairs are in the area of operation of the Ecovida Network, enabling commercialization.

Ecovida Agroecology Network

in numbers

Source: Ecovida Agroecology Network website. Link in section Credits

Knowledge exchanges 

Among the 27 regional “Nucleos” of the Ecovida Network is the “Nucleo Litoral Catarinense.” The collection of farmers and consumer groups receives support from CEPAGRO, and annually they all meet to exchange experiences, debate public policies, and facilitate farmer-to-farmer learning. Similar to the Semear Floripa Network  and their Municipal Meeting of Urban Agriculture, the Ecovida Network also encourages the exchange of knowledge through workshops and events open to wider publics. 

Núcleo Litoral Catarinense Meeting 

Connections

The Center for Studies and Promotion of Group Agriculture is an agroecological organization that establishes connections between countryside, city and the academic community. 

CEPAGRO

CEPAGRO

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here

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Three people involved in agroecological issues talk about the role of urban people in helping to address problems in the countryside. 

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here

Urban People and the Countryside

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Urban People and the Countryside

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This network supports agroecological policy and events in Florianópolis (SC), Brazil. 

Semear Network

Semear

Network

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Acting through 

Networks 

Acting through 

Networks 

Agroecological networks exist in the city, in the country, and across the city and the country.

  

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Agroecological Lives

Agroecological

Lives

The section "Agroecological Lives" shows the history of farmers who chose another way of life and knowledge, agroecology.

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Comuna

Amarildo

Comuna

 Amarildo

The Agrarian Reform Settlement Amarildo de Souza began as an urban occupation 

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