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Political Advocacy

Agroecology is political. There are several forms of participation in which urban and rural people seek to influence public policies related to agroecology and to support institutional changes and even shifts in culture. One approach is through formal representation of organizations, such as the NGO CEPAGRO, in public debate forums about pesticide use of in public meetings of food and nutrition security councils. In other cases, whole political mandates can be organized under the banner of agroecology, as is the case with councilor of Florianópolis (SC, Brazil) Marcos (“Marquito”) José de Abreu. 

Representative spaces
 

Why occupy political spaces? 

Marquito is a councilor from Florianópolis (SC, Brazil). He has a master's degree in Agroecosystems from the Federal University of Santa Catarina (UFSC), was a member of the Center for Studies and Promotion of Group Agriculture (CEPAGRO) and was one of the founders of the Revolution of the Little Buckets. He calls attention to the need to "occupy" spaces where public policies are created. 

Political Changes in Florianópolis 

Eduardo Rocha is the CEO of the Center for Studies and Promotion of Group Agriculture   CEPAGRO , and represents the organization in the Municipal Council for Sustainable Food and Nutritional Security of Florianópolis. He talks about the strength of collectivities in guiding the public agenda and the results of this in Florianópolis (SC, Brazil).

A struggle outside institutional priorities

Altamiro Matos Filho is an agronomist at the Agricultural Research and Rural Extension Company of Santa Catarina (EPAGRI), a rural state-owned extension company. He discusses the need for to constantly reassert the need for state agroecological programs, despite their marginality.  

Everyday politics 

Political advocacy is a part of the everyday lives of people in the agroecology movement, not just in democratic spaces and formal institutions, but also through a culture of agroecology. Agroecology is a way of life, and living agroecologically provides many ways to “vote” for a different food system. People in the movement advocate for an agroecological food system: By buying food through the Responsible Consumer Cells, by participating in networks such as the Ecovida Agroecology Network, by creating physical urban spaces such as urban gardens, through educational initiatives, and in events such as the Agroecological Rice Harvest Festival.  

The necessiy to change institutional values

The testimonials in these videos share some reflections about why civil society needs to participate in all phases of the implementation of public policy, from representation on councils and forums to legislative chambers. In the video below, a technician from the Agricultural Research and Rural Extension Company of Santa Catarina (EPAGRI) reports on the public sector's priorities in the food production chain. This testimony further reinforces the importance of political activism in the Agroecological Movement. 

The Center for Studies and Promotion of Group Agriculture is an agroecological organization that establishes connections between countryside, city and the academic community. 

CEPAGRO

CEPAGRO

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here

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This network supports agroecological policy and events in Florianópolis (SC), Brazil. 

Semear Network

Semear

Network

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Landless Rural Workers Movement

Landless Rural Workers Movement

The Landless Workers Movement is only of the world’s largest agrarian social movements and they advocate for a food system based on Agroecology.  

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Connections

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Acting through 

Networks 

Acting through 

Networks 

Agroecological networks exist in the city, in the country, and across the city and the country.

  

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Discover the project that, through composting, revolutionized a community

Revolution of the Little Buckets

Revolution of the Little Buckets

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here

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Comuna

Amarildo

Comuna

 Amarildo

The Agrarian Reform Settlement Amarildo de Souza began as an urban occupation 

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Vegetais organícos

This project connects eaters and farmers while sharing the responsibility for growing agroecological food.

 

Responsible Consumers

Cells

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Responsible

Consumer

Cells

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Professor Ribas of the Federal University of Santa Catarina (UFSC) talks about urban agriculture in marginalized communities.

The Garden on the Margins

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here

The Garden on the Margins

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The Struggle

for Land

The Struggle 

For Land 

Juliana, MST education coordinator in the State of Santa Catarina, Brazil, describes the historical context of the struggle for Agrarian Reform. 

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Three people involved in agroecological issues talk about the role of urban people in helping to address problems in the countryside. 

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Urban People and the Countryside

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Urban People and the Countryside

This agroecological  community garden is located in the Campeche neighborhood in Florianópolis (SC), Brazil. 

PACUCA

Community Garden

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here

PACUCA

Community Garden

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